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Tag Archives: ankle injury

NBA Season Opens with Gruesome Ankle Injury – Dr Sean Sullivan, PT, DPT – Grand Central

 

The 2017-18 NBA season tipped off last night with a rematch of last years Eastern Conference Finals pitting the Cleveland Cavaliers against the Boston Celtics.  Just minutes into the first quarter Celtic small Forward Gordon Hayward went up for an alley-oop dunk from guard Kyrie Irving when came down awkwardly on his left ankle.  The photo below shows Hayward in the air before landing on his left leg. The next photo shows Hayward sitting on the court in visible pain and gives a great view of how his ankle looked after the fall.  Those who are squeamish, scroll down with caution.

While further details are still to come on the specifics of Hayward’s injury, what we do know is that he sustained a fracture of his left Tibia(Shin Bone) and a dislocation of his ankle joint. He is set to have surgery on that ankle Wednesday back in Boston.  He will likely require a plate/screw/nail fixation(Open reduction with internal fixation) to keep his ankle joint stable and possibly a repair of the ligaments that work to stabilize his ankle.  Luckily the Celtics medical staff were able to reduce/relocate his ankle on the court before placing it in an air cast which helped to reduce his pain.  He also likely avoided any nerve/blood vessel damage that can occur with this type of injury as this would require immediate surgery.

Rehab for this type of surgery is likely to be at least 3-4 months but possibly longer depending on the degree of soft tissue damage that Hayward sustained.  This is important because when a joint is dislocated, often times the surrounding ligaments become compromised, as they work passively to stabilize the joint.  As discussed in my post on high ankle sprains, soft tissue such as ligaments do not heal as quickly as bone due to their poor blood supply.  If the damage to the surrounding ligaments of Hayward’s ankle is severe, this will likely add months to his recovery and will make his return this season very unlikely.

 

The Worst Kind of Ankle Sprain by Dr. Sean Sullivan, PT, DPT – Grand Central

Week 4 of the NFL season just concluded on Monday night following the Kansas City Chiefs last second win over the Washington Redskins.  As with just about every week of NFL games comes a host of injuries to key players on contending teams, often times of the season ending variety.  

Rookie running back Chris Carson of the Seattle Seahawks suffered a season ending left leg injury during the Seahawks win over the Colts on Sunday night.  What was originally diagnosed as a fracture of his left lower leg turned out to be more severe.  In addition to the fracture that he suffered in his fibula, Carson suffered a severe syndesmosis tear otherwise known as a “High Ankle Sprain”.  

The syndesmosis is a series of ligaments that connect the ends of the two lower leg bones, the tibia and the fibula.  A tear of one of these ligaments is a common injury in American football and is generally caused when the athlete’s foot/ankle is pushed into extreme external rotation.  It can also be caused by a blow to the lateral aspect of the knee/lower leg with the foot planted which causes the syndesmosis to be over stretched which is what happened in Carson’s case as seen in the picture below.

The  words “High ankle sprain” are words an athlete never wants to hear.  Unlike a typical lateral ankle sprain which is a tear of one of the lateral ankle ligaments, a syndesmosis tear takes more time to heal.  If there is a disruption of the any of the syndesmosis ligaments, these ligaments are stressed any time the athlete tries to bear weight on that limb as the athlete’s body weight and gravity put stress through the lower leg and tries to separate the tibia and fibula.  This is the primary reason why recovery from a high ankle sprain can take longer to heal and are prone to reoccurrence. 

MRIs are the gold standard for diagnosing a high ankle sprain.  Depending on the grade of the tear, a patient may or may not be instructed to bear weight following the injury.   Upon imaging, if there is no widening of the space between the tibia/fibula, the fracture is considered stable and are treated conservatively with rest/rehab and can weight bear as tolerated.  If there is mild widening of less than 4cm, then the athlete is generally immobilized in a walking boot.   If there is significant widening of the mortise of greater than 4cm, this will require surgical treatment which unfortunately is what will end Carson’s season.  Following surgery, Carson will likely be immobilized in a plaster cast for 2 weeks and transferred to a cast boot for another 4-6 weeks during which he will be non weight bearing to avoid stress to the healing fracture/ligaments.