Recovery Physical Therapy

Exceptional Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Services in Manhattan, Queens, Westchester and New Jersey! Login to Perfect Fit Pro
CALL US - 866-732-6878

Tag Archives: ACL tear

Eagles Star QB Goes Down With ACL Tear by Sean Sullivan, PT, DPT

The Philadelphia Eagles faced off against NFC rival Los Angeles Rams in a contest that many think could be a potential NFC Championship preview.  The Eagles came out with a victory, winning 43-35 but suffered a more important loss.  In the third quarter, the Eagles star quarterback Carson Wentz dived forward for what was initially thought was a touchdown but took a big hit to both of his legs.  The touchdown was called back on a holding penalty but Wentz went on to complete the drive with several hand offs and a great throw in the pocket to receiver Alshon Jeffery for a touchdown.  Wentz left the field on his own volition after the drive and walked back to the locker room amid the long faces of the Eagles support staff.  It was reported later that Wentz had torn his left ACL which will end his potential MVP season.  This is devastating for the Philadelphia Eagles who were super bowl favorites and currently own a 11-2 record, best in the NFC.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries are a very common orthopedic injury in all sports but most notably in sports played on grass/turf due to the high level of cutting required.  ACL injuries are frequently non-contact such as when pushing off or pivoting during which the distal aspect of the lower extremity is pushed laterally causing the knee to buckle inwards (known as a Valgus Stress) which places a large amount of stress on the ligaments of the knee most notably the ACL and the Medial Collateral Ligament. ACL injuries can also be from contact or blunt force trauma as in the case of Wentz.  A blow to the lateral side of the knee can cause a large valgus force that can lead to an ACL tear.

The ACL is one of the key stabilizing ligaments of the knee along with the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and the lateral collateral ligament.  The ACL’s primary function is to control anterior translation of the lower leg(Tibia) on the upper leg(Femur).  When one or more of the knee ligaments are not intact, the knee becomes inherently unstable and can cause the knee to buckle or suffer additional soft tissue injuries.  For athletes, this is especially problematic as they will not be able to confidently cut or pivot on their affected knee.  When a high level professional athlete suffers a complete rupture of the ACL, reconstruction of the ligament is necessary if the athlete wishes to return to sport.  

Rehabilitation for an athlete undergoing ACL reconstruction generally takes about 6-8 months to return to sport but can sometimes take over a year.  It is important to make sure that the graft that is used to replace the deficient ACL is as strong as it needs to be to tolerate the extreme stresses at the knee of high level sports.  It is also important for the athlete to regain as much knee/hip strength (most notably the hamstring which assists the ACL in preventing anterior translation of the tibias) as possible to regain stability at the knee.  The athlete must also gain the confidence to compete at a high level on their affected knee which can often be the limiting factor in returning to sport.  Early ACL rehab focuses on the athlete regaining full knee range of motion as well as volitional quadriceps strength to allow them to fully straighten the knee.  Focus in the first few months is placed on strengthening all of the muscles of the knee/hip/ankle as well as working on balance and proprioception to help return the knee to its pre-injured state.  Once the new graft has been given ample time to set (10-12 weeks) more high level strengthening and some sports specific training can begin.

https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif