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Why Wilmer Flores’ Knee Infection is Serious Business

Mets first baseman Wilmer Flores was placed on the DL on Friday and spent the weekend in the hospital to receive IV treatment for a knee infection. Evidently, Flores had played with discomfort for a couple of days before seeking medical attention.

Though this diagnosis may not sound like much, it is one that can be quite serious. It is considered an emergent condition with high risk of morbidity or mortality if not quickly and aggressively addressed. The outcome of treatment hinges on it. Read More ›

Lucas Duda – Explaining Elbow Hyperextension Injuries

Mets’ first baseman Lucas Duda suffered a hyperextended left elbow in the fifth inning on Wednesday when Cesar Hernandez, the Phillies’ second baseman, tried to run out an infield hit up the first base line and ran into Duda’s glove with his left shoulder as he fielded the throw from the pitcher. Though he remained in the game through the half inning, Duda was removed for a pinch hitter in the bottom of the fifth. Duda will likely have an MRI today to determine the extent of his injury.

Read More ›

Concussions – Part 3: Football and CTE

We’ve all heard much about the dangers of football and the alarming incidence of concussions in the sport. Also about the NFL’s initial resistance to acknowledging the probable relationship of concussions to Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), which currently can only be diagnosed on autopsy.

CTE – as defined by the Boston University CTE Center16 – is “a progressive degenerative disease of the brain found in athletes (and others) with a history of repetitive brain trauma, including symptomatic concussions as well as asymptomatic subconcussive hits to the head… This trauma triggers progressive degeneration of the brain tissue, including the build-up of an abnormal protein called tau.  These changes in the brain can begin months, years, or even decades after the last brain trauma or end of active athletic involvement.  The brain degeneration is associated with memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment, impulse control problems, aggression, depression, and, eventually, progressive dementia.”

The concern many have is not only for the health and safety of the athletes. Others who have suffered mild traumatic brain injury want to know if they are susceptible to CTE as well. No one really has that answer yet. However, lets look carefully at the information that is out there and how it can be interpreted.

First, scary as it may be, recognize that the high incidence of CTE reported in studies reflects several biases. The most significant of these is self-selection. The brains that have been examined on autopsy are primarily those of athletes who have donated their brains for research due to symptoms they’ve experienced, or those whose family has suspected the diagnosis. This clearly inflates the percentages of athletes diagnosed with the condition.

One such study done by Boston University and the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs17 established that 87 of 91 football players had signs of CTE on autopsy, while Boston University also found the condition in 79% (131 of 165) of football players across all levels.17

These frightening results are mildly contrasted by another study18 that looked at 60+ former NFL players – all aged 60-69 – to try to identify symptoms of CTE in living people. Their age range indicates that these were players who played before heightened concussion awareness and before protocols were initiated by the NFL. The results showed that 60% had completely normal age-appropriate cognitive decline. Of the remaining 40%, 6% met the criteria for dementia. It would be interesting – and possibly revealing – to be able to correlate the findings on these men with how their brains subsequently present on autopsy.

Though this group also played before helmets were improved, the sturdier helmets may even have encouraged harder hitting. The NFL’s response has included recent rule changes to modulate direct hits to the head, though the game will likely see an even greater proportion of debilitating but less threatening lower body injuries as a result. The players of today are also typically stronger, bigger and faster than those in the era of those tested in this study. This too likely influences the frequency and outcomes of traumas that they experience.

Though the brain has the ability to recover from one injury, long-term effects are more likely after multiple incidents.

However, keep in mind that football players sustain blows to the head (direct and/or indirect) on almost every play. This cumulative subconcussive microtrauma may be as much or more of a factor in causing CTE than one or few isolated incidents of concussive trauma. Not at all good for football or soccer players, but an encouraging note for others who fear the long term effects of having sustained a concussion, or even several of them.

Vulnerability differs amongst athletes on the field. Dr. Steven Erickson noted that offensive linemen face forces “that are generally linear and the players know they are coming. Consequently, the head doesn’t move very much, so the brain doesn’t move very much. This may still represent brain trauma, but less often to the degree of causing concussion.”

He contrasted this with receivers. Though the “magnitude of the forces they sustain may be lower, the rotational component to the trauma, the player not being able to anticipate the nature of the hit and the degree of subsequent brain motion all make it more likely they will sustain a clinical concussion.”

A study by the Mayo Clinic, published in December 2015, found that one in three amateur athletes who participated in contact sports while in school developed CTE. 19 That statistic will likely cause even more scrutiny of the games and cause some to weigh the risk-reward of participation differently than before. Again though, this study also reflected issues of self-selection.

I asked Dr. Erickson about the cheating (underperforming) on baseline screening that we have read about occurring in the NFL, and whether this effort by some players to lessen the likelihood that a subsequent concussion will be diagnosed can be detected.

His response was that “though it may be possible, there are internal checks with ImPACT™ whereby validity scores can generally identify when an individual is cheating.”

Dr. Erickson commented that “this is another advantage of the vestibular test (see Part 2 of this series) advocated at the Banner Concussion Center, because a non-physiologic response is detected with intentional underperformance or anxiety responses to testing, We benefit from the fact that athletes don’t know how to cheat to underperform on the test.”

He added that “of course, best medicine is for an athlete to put in best effort at baseline as well as post injury. The motivation factor is very real. Sometimes those not particularly motivated in baseline testing are very motivated to achieve in order to return to play,”

Hopefully more athletes and their coaches are acknowledging that playing through will not serve them well either in the short or long term.

The Takeaway

So, does the Banner Concussion team advocate keeping kids from playing sports? Most definitely not… Each member acknowledges the many benefits of sport, such as exercise, physical development and emotional growth. Developing mental toughness and learning life lessons such as teamwork and how to deal with adversity while enjoying a healthy social outlet that is fun, challenging and productive trumps fear.

They stress that concussion can happen almost any time – even to those who don’t play sports – and that sports can be made safe. The key to addressing concussion is education and diligence. It is important to be able to identify concussion if/when it happens and seek appropriate assessment and care. By managing the symptoms, recovery is accelerated and the likelihood of recurrence minimized. The value of baseline testing cannot be stressed enough nor can the importance of not allowing an athlete of any age to return to play after sustaining a head trauma resulting in symptoms without undergoing an evaluation.

Though most who suffer a concussion recover fully and within a four-week period, the caution is to understand that symptoms left untreated – can result in long lasting consequences.

As for those who sustain multiple head traumas and, quite possibly – or especially – those who have also suffered repeated microtrauma, the long term effects are coming into better focus with the further study of CTE.

References for Parts 1-3 of the Concussion Series:

  1. http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/headsup/pdf/Facts_for_Physicians_booklet-a.pdf
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Report to Congress on mild traumatic brain injury in the United States: steps to prevent a serious public health problem. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2003.
  3. Lescohier I, DiScala C. Blunt trauma in children: causes and outcomes of head versus intracranial injury. Pediatrics 1993;91(4):721-5.
  4. Langlois JA, Rutland-Brown W, Wald M. The epidemiology and impact of traumatic brain injury: a brief overview. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 2006;21(5):375-8
  5. Finkelstein E, Corso P, Miller T and associates. The Incidence and Economic Burden of Injuries in the United States. New York (NY): Oxford University Press; 2006.
  6. Fung M, Willer B, Moreland D, Leddy J. A proposal for an evidence-based emergency department discharge form for mild traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury 2006;20(9):889-94.
  7. Alexander, Andrew L., Lee, Jee Eun, Lazar, Mariana, Field, Aaron, S.

Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Brain. Neurotherapeutics. 2007 Jul; 4(3): 316–329.doi:  10.1016/j.nurt.2007.05.011

  1. Field M, Collins M, Lovell M, Maroon J. Does age play a role in recovery from sports-related concussion? A comparison of high school and collegiate athletes. The Journal of Pediatrics 2003;142(5):546-53.
  2. Bryan Kolb, PhDand Robbin Gibb, PhD: Brain Plasticity and Behaviour in the Developing Brain . J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Nov; 20(4): 265–276.
  1. Guskiewicz K, et al. Cumulative effects associated with recurrent concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study. JAMA 2003;290(19):2549-55.
  2. Pellman EJ, Lovell MR, Viano DC, Casson IR. Concussion in professional football: recovery of NFL and high school athletes assessed by computerized neuropsychological testing–Part 12. Neurosurgery 2006;58(2):263-74;discussion 263-74
  1. Kashluba S, Casey JE, Paniak C. Evaluating the utility of ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for postconcussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 2006;12(1):111-8.
  2. Dean PJ, O’Neill D, Sterr A. Post-concussion syndrome: prevalence after mild traumatic brain injury in comparison with a sample without head injury. Brain Inj. 2012;26(1):14-26. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2011.635354.Epub 2011 Nov 22
  1. McManus, C. Stress-Induced Hyperalgesia: Clinical Implications for the Physical Therapist Orthopedic Physical Therapy Practice. 2012;24(3):165-168. (http://carolynmcmanus.com/publications/mcmanus-stress-induced-hyperalgesia.pdf)
  2. UPMC Sports Medicine Website
  3. Boston University CTE Center: http://www.bu.edu/cte/about/what-is-cte/
  4. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/new-87-deceased-nfl-players-test-positive-for-brain-disease/
  5. Hart, J.J., JAMA Neurology 2013
  6. Mayo Clinic Press Release: Mayo Clinic: Evidence suggests contact sports played by amateurs increase risk of degenerative disorder http://newsletter.carehubs.com/t/ViewEmail/j/2B6E3073A3AD413C/59F3204D88C0AFA89A8E73400EDACAB4
  1. Aubry M, et al. Summary and agreement statement of the first International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Vienna 2001. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine 2002 Jan;12(1):6-11

 

 

 

 

Concussions: Part Two – Assessment and Follow-Up

The Assessment

Baseline testing should be a high priority of every athletic department, coach, parent (of a student athlete) and athlete, and should include cognitive, vestibular and visual assessment. Cognitive testing alone – frequently performed without the other components – is insufficient. This holds true in cases of post injury assessment as well.

For athletes who have had the benefit of baseline testing (performed pre-season and prior to injury), the comparison to their normative values – after a concussion occurs – proves very helpful in assessing the degree of dysfunction and determining complete recovery. Since the rest of us may not have this advantage, it is the thorough post-injury assessment alone that is the key to determining the loss of function and in guiding treatment.

One caveat that Dr. Erickson of the Banner Concussion Center stresses is that in a game situation, it is NOT okay to simply ask the athlete who may have suffered a concussion if he or she is okay and trust that the information received is accurate. The athlete should be removed from play and evaluated. Keep this in mind if you are an adult participating in recreational sports – sitting out may be the tough but obvious best option. You may not know until later that what seemed like jarring but manageable contact was, in fact, concussive.

If when consulting a provider for care following concussion, you – or a loved one – does not receive an assessment of all the components of a thorough assessment that are described below, please seek care elsewhere. Whether the center you go to can meet your needs in-house or relies on outside referrals to do so, any piece of the puzzle that is omitted might result in overlooking an element that could influence recovery.

The assessment should include:

  1. A physical exam by a physician specializing in sports medicine/internal medicine to rule out more serious pathology, diagnose concussion and to identify any other injuries (particularly of a musculoskeletal nature) that may have occurred along with the mild head injury.
  2. ImPACT15: ImPACT™ – which stands for Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing – is a computerized neurocognitive tool developed in 2000 by a medical team at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). It is used to assess brain processing speed, verbal and visual memory, reaction time and visual motor skills (in those at least 11 years old). This tool was established after its developers had first utilized paper and pencil testing methods, and prior to professional sports leagues acknowledging that cognitive testing was necessary in the management of concussions. In addition to its vital role in identifying dysfunction, ImPACT™ is utilized to help determine the degree of recovery. In each instance, scores are compared to normative values.

According to Dr. Erickson, the NFL began to require baseline neuropsychological or neurocognitive testing in 2005-2006 and MLB also instituted a program in 2006. The NHL also currently mandates baseline testing, as does NASCAR. The NBA, Formula One and WWE also currently utilize ImPACT™ baseline testing, as do a number of NCAA Division One Programs.

  1. Audiology evaluation: screens for dizziness, hearing, tinnitus and inner ear disorders associated with mild traumatic brain injury.
  1. Neurovestibular and balance testing (ideally using the Banner or University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Protocol):

Many treatment facilities test balance without attention to its integration with the visual and vestibular system. This is a significant omission.

The vestibular system provides important sensory information about motion, equilibrium, and spatial orientation. The utricle, saccule, and three semicircular canals within each ear comprise the vestibular apparatus. The utricle and saccule detect gravity (vertical orientation) and linear movement.

The smallest bones in the body are the three ossicles of the middle ear. They are the link transmitting vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. They also serve to amplify sound. A blow to the head can cause displacement of the ossicles resulting in vestibular disturbance and complaints of feeling like the room is spinning or foggy-headedness. Identifying the nature/direction of this displacement is crucial to pinpointing the type of treatment the physical therapist should perform.

The Banner NVP TM protocol was developed in 2013 by Shelly Massingale, MS, PT and Dr. Steven Erickson of the Banner Concussion Center, in conjunction with Bertec® and utilizing Bertec® force plate technology and Computerized Dynamic Posturography. This trademarked protocol was designed to stimulate and assess a person’s ability to integrate feedback from visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems following MTBI. It incorporates functional balance conditions that directly stimulate the vestibular ocular reflex (known as the vestibular ocular reflex suppression test). This reflex reflects the relationship between the visual system and that of the inner ear and is responsible for enabling fixation of the eyes during head movements.

  1. Fine motor skill testing: assesses coordination using timed measures of fine motor dexterity.
  1. Visual motor testing: Functional visual integration testing using static (without movement) and dynamic (with movement) visual acuity screening to assess eye movement and head coordination.

Neha Amin, O.D., FAAO, the lead optometrist at the Banner Concussion Center shared some of the visual dysfunctions frequently identified on the optometry exam. They include:

  • Blurred vision: It is possible someone might have had mild blurring pre-injury that he or she is able to compensate for, but a concussion may cause it to worsen and for the patient to become symptomatic.
  • Double vision – this is very common. The eyes may be clear individually but have difficulty working together.
  • Tracking Issues – With tracking issues, the eye movements are very inaccurate as it relates to the two eyes working together. Pre-accident, one eye may be stronger and one weaker. Post-injury, a patient may no longer be able to tolerate that imbalance.
  • Focusing –(accommodative dysfunction) the ability to focus and relax that focus for seeing distance to near, and vice versa (i.e., in the classroom – blackboard to desk). A dysfunction in focusing can result in double/unclear/blurry vision, headaches, attention deficits or a seeming loss of visual acuity.
  • Vergence Issues – convergence and divergence

Convergence, when the eyes move inward toward each other, is important for all near vision tasks and must occur automatically when an object approaches you. When insufficient, double vision is a common side effect.

See if you notice… look in the distance across the room. Now hold a pen in front of your head around 12 inches from your nose. Look from across the room to the pen. Do you feel your eyes turning in? Now pull the pen towards your nose… how close can you bring it before it becomes double?

Many times the ability to converge the eyes is overlooked in eye exams. Do you ever get tired and feel difficulty in “focusing” on a book or computer screen? Do you ever feel like you see double? This is likely due to poor eye alignment. Poor alignment can cause headaches due to the strain to keep your eyes aligned. This same near stress can decrease concentration, and reading accuracy. Attention deficit disorder is heavily linked to this ocular stress.

Dr. Amin noted that convergence Insufficiency has a very high success rate in therapy. Most people exhibit marked improvement after two weeks, noticing diminished eyestrain and headaches along with enhanced attention. Most cases can be alleviated in 3-6 months, depending on the motivation of the patients.

Divergence is the opposite of convergence. Divergence means to move the eyes outward and away from each other and usually occurs when looking at an object moving further away.

If you are doing close reading, your eyes will need to diverge to see far away. Divergence excess means the eyes turn out too much when looking in the distance. This creates a problem for the patient, who will either see double when looking far away, or suppress an eye (shut an eye off).

Likewise, divergence insufficiency means the eyes do not spread apart enough to see in the distance. When the patient is looking far away, the eyes may appear crossed, or one eye may appear turned in slightly. Again, either one eye will shut off or the patient may see double.

Post Concussion Treatment:

Treatment should be individualized to address all of the specific dysfunctions determined to be present during the assessment. It is progressed by determining the reactiveness of the symptoms to the exercises that are prescribed and making adjustments as necessary. Visual, balance and vestibular exercises (with the latter’s focus on combining balance with rapid head movements) are patient specific, as are those that gradually restore each client to full physical activity. The idea is to challenge each of the systems sufficiently that symptoms (i.e., nausea, headaches) may be provoked or amplified mildly yet briefly and resolve to pre- treatment levels or better very quickly (within five minutes). If an exercise fails to sufficiently challenge symptoms, it should be advanced.

The brain responds to habituation (accomplished with repetition), and so patients are advised to do their home exercises three times daily. They are also urged to gradually re-introduce functional activities. If instead they avoid those things that reproduce symptoms (like exposure to light, head movements, or being in a car) the brain becomes even more sensitized. It is important to get out, to walk, to socialize and to seek enjoyment. In addition to the inherent value of such activities, they enhance mood and in that way also accelerate recovery.

With treatment, the vestibular piece typically resolves quickly – often with only one or two sessions in the hands of a skilled physical therapist to reposition ossicles that are out of alignment. There is currently more objective data established via research to determine vestibular recovery than that for the visual system.

The visual piece is less clear. There are fewer objective tests and it is more difficult to assess. Not knowing an individual’s pre-injury status also makes it more complicated, as issues may have predated concussion. This can take much longer to improve, and treatment should continue – though on a much less frequent basis – long after a person tests normally.

Repeated assessment throughout the recovery process enables therapists and doctors to effectively monitor patient progress across all systems. Symptom resolution generally correlates to achieving normative values.

The primary role of the neuropsychologist in the Banner treatment model is to evaluate cognition and assess any possible confounding factors. ImPACT™ results and a client’s neuropsych performance are correlated. Cognitive and emotional issues are identified, and appropriate follow-up education is provided.

Dr. DenBoer noted that many clients do not understand why they are having problems such as issues with attention, concentration and processing speed. Repeated neuropsychology assessments determine the degree to which the various therapies are working on a neuropscyh and cognitive basis.

The neuropsychologist on the treatment team also provides intervention regarding sports psych issues for patients dealing with psychological variables/anxieties with return to school, work or play. This may include seeking academic accommodation for students seeking return to full participation in the classroom, or modified duty for those requiring accommodations at work. While the other therapies provide care to restore function, the neuropsychologist on the team  addresses strategies to return to a pre-injury lifestyle and improve coping skills.

Headaches can throw recovery off course:

Chronic intractable headaches, not uncommon after concussion, are a symptom that can get in the way of recovery.

Occipital nerve blocks are done with some regularity by neurologists for the treatment of migraines. These entail steroid injections to the nerve at the base of the skull. Dr. Erickson opts for this strategy at Banner when he feels the intervention is necessary to eliminate post concussion headaches. This enables patients to effectively perform and respond to the various therapies (visual, balance and vestibular), curtailing factors that may have been causative of the headaches in the first place. By the time the block wears off, the other systems have been normalized and the headaches generally do not return.

Should headache symptoms persist after an initial injection, or if they return, an additional block may be administered or the patient treated with Botox injection. At Banner, these patients are referred for consultation with a neurologist.

My research has led me to believe that multiple injections are not necessarily the answer in the event headaches return some time after the initial trials. Chronic headaches that may be a factor in persistent post concussion syndrome or that result from repeated trauma might best be approached with biofeedback and other alternative strategies along with nutritional guidance and exercise to best modulate symptoms.

Banner’s Care Delivery Model

The best concussion care employs a very specific, methodical and solitary approach to concussion that results in a very individualized rehab plan for every individual. Though everyone is tested the same way, each client’s experience can be unique.

The Banner program, established in 2013, was the first center of its kind offering an integrated and comprehensive program in which all disciplines work together closely under one roof. This profoundly enhances care. The professionals work as a team, providing each client with a comprehensive assessment. They meet regularly to customize the course of treatment, monitor each patient’s progress and determine readiness for discharge. There is little need to refer outside of the practice (other than as needed for orthopedic physical therapy, neurology or medical imaging offered at the medical center’s outpatient facility across the street).

The Banner Center’s medical model is also unusual in that it’s director, Steven Erickson, MD, is a sports medicine specialist, and not a neuropsychologist. He guides and oversees the entire team. That team includes physical therapists whose specialization is in the vestibular system/balance, ocular specialists (a board certified neuro-optometrist specializing in diagnosis and visual therapy, and an occupational therapist/patient care coordinator who also specializes in visual therapy), neuro/sports psychologists and athletic trainers.

Another distinguishing factor that gives Banner a distinct edge is the unique dynamic method of computerized neurovestibular testing that they developed. It provides objective measures of neurologic function by assessing balance (in double leg stance – meaning on two feet) and it’s relationship with the visual system and head movement (the vestibular component). The force plate technology employed enables objective measures that are far more exacting than the subjective assessment utilized by most outside professionals. Many still test balance more traditionally – without movement (statically), and utilizing various standing positions (including single leg stance) that do not account for the presence of an orthopedic condition that would influence the outcome. By testing in this way, others likely miss dysfunctions that should be addressed in treatment.

Shelly Massingale and Steven Erickson will soon publish their methods and data regarding the rational and methods for the type of testing they do. It is their hope that others will incorporate it into their programs. Though force plate technology is state of-the-art, there are ways to improvise and utilize this information even in the absence of these expensive tools.

There are other concussion centers out there that offer pieces of Banner’s model. The closest is at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), which as previously noted, developed the computerized ImPACT™ program that is considered to be the gold standard in working with brain injuries. UPMC also independently developed a balance-testing format much like Banner’s. If you are based on the east coast, want a great assessment, and are willing to travel, Pittsburgh is the place to go. The Cleveland Clinic is another highly regarded facility that developed an interesting iPad based neurocognitive program that is different than the ImPACT™ program. They, like UPMC and Banner are also advancing the model of care.

Other smaller centers offer components but not the integrated on-site team approach that is so ideal. These providers refer out for patients to receive the full complement of therapies they may need. For emphasis, it can’t be overstated that if you or someone you know seeks post concussion care at a smaller center, each piece of the assessment and treatment puzzle must be a part of the plan of action. It may be left up to the patient – or someone advocating for that individual – to see to it that the appropriate referrals are obtained along with consistent follow-up treatment.

Return to Activity

Once the acute post concussion phase has passed, limiting academic or work hours as well as cognitive and physical demands is recommended. Incorporating periods of rest proves very helpful.

Progression to full performance of academic or employment responsibilities should be stepped up gradually. It is important to avoid fatigue, excessive stress or symptom exacerbation in a quest to return to full function.

Criteria for returning to sports participation include:

  • Complete resolution of symptoms at rest and with cognitive or physical exertion
  • Demonstration of normal function on neurocognitive, visual, vestibular and balance testing
  • The Concussion in Sport Group established a specific return to play protocol20. It begins with rest and then stresses a gradual increase in activity that first incorporates aerobic exercise and then progresses to sport-specific training. The program advances further by adding non-contact drills (such as cutting and other lateral movements) and ultimately includes full contact controlled training. A return to full participation in any sport – contact or otherwise – is predicated on successful completion of all phases without any symptom provocation.

Part Three will conclude the series on concussions with discussion of football and CTE 

Concussions: So Much More Than Football And CTE

Though the media has bombarded us with articles, news reports and even a film on concussions, the confounding thing is that so little of the information geared to the general public has served to really educate and inform. There is so much more to this story than football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). For instance, how do you know if you’ve suffered a concussion? If you have, what should you expect? Where should you go to receive optimal care, and what should that entail? How scared should you be? Buckle up, take a deep breath and relax… there is a wealth of information to share.

The mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) that is a concussion happens to countless ordinary people every day. You or someone you love may even have been one of them. The injury might have resulted from a simple fall or a tumble taken in sports like skiing or cycling. Trauma sustained in a car accident or in a war zone blast might be to blame, or maybe you sustained a contact injury in a heated game of just about any team sport. Regardless of the mechanism of injury, the course of care should follow a very specific process. A thorough assessment is step one, in order to identify any cognitive, visual or vestibular and balance dysfunctions (all of which will be explained later) as well as a myriad of possible symptoms that must be addressed. This should be followed by highly personalized treatment focused on restoring symptom free and full function.

Concussion care is a fairly new specialty because for so long little was understood about the injury itself as well as the appropriate course of treatment. There remains much to learn. The medical management of concussions is a specialty that requires post-graduate education regardless of the professional discipline involved (neuropsychology, vestibular/physical therapy (PT), neuro-optometry, occupational/visual therapy and sports medicine (physicians, orthopedic PTs & athletic trainers). Experience counts for a lot and, as with professionals in any field, not all are created equal. Educated consumers have to know what to look for in order to best advocate for themselves and their loved ones.

The important thing to emphasize, however, is that with accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, the overwhelming majority of people with MTBI recover fully, even those with post concussion syndrome; More on that to follow.

Some Statistics

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) literature1 reports “that an estimated 75%-90% of the 1.4 million traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department visits that occur each year are concussions or other forms of MTBI. 2,3 In addition, approximately 1.6 – 3.8 million sports and recreation-related TBIs occur in the United States each year”, 4 and many “of these are MTBIs that are not treated in a hospital or emergency department.” There are many other places to go for care.

The numbers reveal an economic factor at play as well – even outside of the NFL. A study done in the US in 2000 found that direct as well as indirect costs – such as lost productivity from MTBI – totaled an estimated 12 billion dollars 5

A little background information on concussions:

It is important to recognize that not every head blow causes a concussion. This was the first thing Dr. Steven Erickson, emphasized when we spoke. Dr. Erickson, who, in addition to being a co-founder and the Medical Director of the Banner Concussion Center in Phoenix, AZ, is a consultant for MLB umpires.

Any head trauma that results in the onset of temporary neurologic symptoms (be it from a direct or indirect blow) is considered to be a concussion. The injury is due to the brain moving quickly within the skull and may or may not entail a loss of consciousness; Typically, a collection of cognitive, physical, emotional and/or sleep-related symptoms results.

This includes some of the 22 common symptoms specifically listed and rated on a 0-6 scale on a form that each Banner client completes both prior to and following every treatment (See the list in Figure 1 below), as well as neck pain and ringing in the ears (tinnitus). It also includes any less typical symptoms a patient might report, such as “seeing the color green”.

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Figure 1: Banner Concussion Center’s In-Office Symptom Score Sheet

Clients rate each symptom on a 0-6 scale prior to and following every treatment session.

  1. Headache                                                                                12. Sensitivity to noise
  2. Nausea                                                                                     13. Irritability
  3. Vomiting                                                                                  14. Sadness
  4. Balance Problems                                                                  15. Nervousness
  5. Dizziness                                                                                  16. Feeling more emotional
  6. Fatigue                                                                                      17. Numbness or tingling
  7. Trouble falling asleep                                                            18. Feeling slowed down
  8. Sleeping more than usual                                                     19. Feeling mentally foggy
  9. Sleeping less than usual                                                        20. Difficulty concentrating
  10. Drowsiness                                                                               21. Difficulty remembering
  11. Sensitivity to light                                                                   22. Visual problems

Patients are also questioned regarding these additional common symptoms:

  • Neck Pain
  • Ringing in your ears

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The most common symptoms after concussion include: visual disturbances, sensitivity to light or noise, headaches, nausea or vomiting, difficulties concentrating or remembering, balance problems, emotional changes and alterations in sleep pattern.

While more severe traumatic brain injuries cause structural damage, the clinical signs and symptoms of altered brain function after MTBI can be attributed more to dysfunction of brain metabolism. This entails “a complex cascade of ionic, metabolic and physiologic events.” 6

Making the Diagnosis:

A thorough initial evaluation is of paramount importance to determine whether the injured person has something even more serious. Concussion is a diagnosis of exclusion – emergent conditions such as skull fracture or an acute subdural hematoma (a bleed between the covering of brain – the dura – and the brain itself) must first be ruled out.

Dr. Erickson stressed that the best place to start is at the Emergency Room, where greater awareness and improved training has resulted in movement away from automatic CT scans for mild head trauma.

Tests such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or Computerized Tomography (CT) are not able to diagnose the disturbance of brain function typical after concussion because there are generally no associated abnormalities on structural neuroimaging. Mild concussive trauma is unlikely to cause tearing of the tissues in the brain and so no bleeding results. It is the collection of blood that would otherwise be evident on imaging.

Dr. John DenBoer, Clinical Neuropsychologist/Sports Psychologist at Banner, whose outside private practice affiliation is with Mental Edge Neuropsychology in Scottsdale, emphasized that with “almost any other injury or illness, you do a scan or run a blood test and you can define it… whereas the testing after concussion focuses on function.” He commented that though “diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) 7 shows how the white matter tracks in the brain are disrupted by concussion, this is not widely used due to cost and availability. They have it in only ten clinics around the country and currently use it largely for legal cases or research studies.”

Diagnosis can sometimes prove tricky because symptoms can mimic those of other diagnoses (such as headache syndromes, PTSD…) and may have a delayed onset. However, once concussion is diagnosed, it is best to seek care within the first week.

When examining a patient after head trauma, gaining an understanding of the nature of the force sustained can be helpful; was it a direct blow to the head or a body (indirect) blow? A body blow may cause a whiplash injury where the head moves forward then backward rapidly. If the impact was a direct one, where was the hit absorbed? Different symptom patterns may emerge depending on the specific mechanism of injury.1

In addition, the severity of symptoms may relate to the degree of impact. Those who have sustained multiple concussions may exhibit more involved symptoms than expected, a reflection of their vulnerability and/or a psychological overlay whereby increased anxiety about the consequences of sustaining another blow can amplify symptoms.

Patients should be screened for amnesia, which may result after sustaining concussion. This sometimes affects recall of events prior to the injury (retrograde amnesia), or may affect memory of event that followed (anterograde amnesia). In addition, the examining physician generally relies on bystanders to determine whether the individual suffered seizures (an atypical occurrence). Family members can also contribute valuable information regarding signs of mild brain trauma that they may have observed since the injury was sustained.

The immediate post injury period:

If concussion is suspected, it is important to avoid physical activity and mental exertion (stimulation such as watching television, using a computer or reading), get plenty of rest, stay well hydrated and avoid caffeine or alcohol (information on brain foods that boost cognitive function can be found here). This initial protective phase after injury is key. A medical provider should be consulted and, in the event of severe symptoms, going to the ER immediately is crucial.

The Recovery Process:

An uncomplicated course of recovery is generally seven to 14 days for adults and 14 to 21 days (for children and adolescents). This is interesting because – though younger people have increased plasticity of the nervous system8 – the immature brain takes longer to recover from trauma. 9,10,11

If you’ve had one concussion are you more likely to sustain another?

Dr. Erickson, noted that his “guess is that at least 10% of those with full symptomatic recovery and complete cognitive recovery may still have vestibular dysfunction that predisposes to other injury.” This actually represents an incomplete recovery. In other words, even if you think you are better, you may not be. Inadequate care may leave you with residual vestibular or visual dysfunction, creating an otherwise avoidable susceptibility to additional head trauma.

Dr. Erickson’s experience has also shown that there is what he refers to as “a concussion threshold that is lowered even after a complete visual, cognitive and vestibular recovery and when an individual is symptom free. Individuals are more likely to have a subsequent concussion for a period of several weeks to months even with less impact involved. There is no definitive formula.

At the most extreme end of the spectrum is what is referred to as Second Impact Syndrome. Dr. Erickson noted that this condition is preventable. “An emphasis must be placed on kids reporting injury, and then getting them off the field immediately thereafter. Many play through, and every year a few kids die of this syndrome. Another big head blow very shortly after an untreated concussion can result in a loss of control of the auto-regulation of blood flow. This results in swelling and death. Second Impact Syndrome has been seen only in kids. There have been no reports in the literature of this occurring in adults.

This can’t be researched for obvious reasons – it would entail intentionally delivering a second blow and monitoring the outcome.”

Post Concussion Syndrome:

According to Dr. Erickson, approximately 70% of concussions follow an uncomplicated course. Recovery that occurs outside the normative recovery curve (longer than what is expected) is referred to as post concussion syndrome. Here, the literature is confusing, with some publications saying that symptoms persisting for three or more months constitute post concussion syndrome 12, while others note that it begins after four weeks (Banner), and still others only after a year.13

I believe the discrepancy in these definitions is due in part to the fact that clients at the Banner Center receive care that identifies and addresses any and all deficits across the various systems. Because of this, the typical patient has an uncomplicated course of recovery within the expected time period.

A prolonged recovery is generally due to persistent vestibular, visual or cognitive deficits, usually with some emotional or psychological stress or anxiety. The psychological component – which is a biological response that may also include depression – is “completely understandable for those with delayed recovery and persistent debilitating symptoms, such as headaches.”

Sherry Massingale, MPT, Senior Clinical Manager at the Banner Concussion Center, noted that with post concussion syndrome, “the overarching concern – and the fear of further trauma or setbacks that often accompanies delayed recovery – can serve to worsen or perpetuate physical symptoms or symptoms of depression. It may also result in self-limiting behavior due a fear of returning to the activity that resulted in injury or any activity that subsequently exacerbates symptoms”

Though post concussion syndrome is more likely after each successive concussion, 10 there is no definitive generic pattern. The higher incidence is more likely due to alterations neurochemically or psychologically, especially if the sufferer/athlete has had prior longer-term recoveries. Persistent symptoms are also more common after mild brain injury to those with a history of anxiety/depression, or those who have previously exhibited neurologic hypersensitivity. This population typically has a heightened somatic response to psychological stress – whereby pain is more readily elicited or amplified. Dr. DenBoer stressed that this type of pain – though very real and not at all imagined – can be effectively modulated or resolved via strategies such as mindfulness or other behavioral modification techniques.

The biologic responses that occur with these techniques provide strong scientific evidence of their benefits in the prevention and treatment of chronic pain as well as in effectively boosting mood.14

Part 2 of this article will focus on Assessment, and Part 3 on Football and CTE. Articles referenced and footnoted will appear at the conclusion.

Gary Sanchez and Bicep Injuries

Gary Sanchez, right-handed New York Yankees catcher, and a relied upon contributor at the plate, evidently sustained what has been called a right biceps strain when fouling off a 97-mph fastball in Saturday’s fifth inning 5-4 road-loss to Baltimore. He exited the field after a painful practice swing, and has yet to undergo a complete diagnostic work-up to determine the extent of the injury. MLB.com reported Sanchez claimed “it felt kind of like when you pull a hamstring.” By Sunday, it was noted that he was feeling somewhat better, a great sign. Sanchez was placed on the 10 day DL pending further assessment.

We’ll know more about Sanchez’ injury after an MRI, but what we do know is that it is his elbow – the distal (lowermost) end of the tendon – that is painful, rather than the uppermost portion at the shoulder.

A little about the biceps muscle

The biceps derives its name because it has two heads, each of which has a different attachment at its origin in the shoulder region. The long head of the biceps attaches in the shoulder joint (at the supraglenoid tubercle), while the shorter head originates at the coracoid, a bony process that juts forward from the scapula (shoulder blade) and lies under the clavicle (collar bone). The muscle provides a degree of stability at the shoulder by depressing the head of the humerus, preventing it from riding upward, which would cause impingement on the structures in that region.

Both heads of the biceps converge to attach at their distal (lowermost) end, to two sites at the upper portion of the radius (one of the two bones at the forearm). So, in other words, there are two proximal bicep tendons in the shoulder region and only one at the distal end near the elbow.

The primary functions of the biceps are to flex the elbow and to supinate the forearm (rotate it to turn the palm forward/upward, as if turning a doorknob). It also contributes (secondarily) to flexing the shoulder.

Muscle Strain

Sanchez was diagnosed with a strain and, like ligament sprains, these are graded from 1 to 3 with a Grade I being a tweak to the muscle/tendon and a Grade 3 being a complete rupture. It would have likely been apparent had Sanchez completely ruptured the tendon, so the questions that remain are how much damage was done, and how long will it take him to respond to treatment and be back on the field. 

Distal biceps injury at the elbow region

These are less common than those to the proximal biceps at the shoulder. Ruptures to the distal tendon, which occur primarily on the dominant side, cause elbow flexion and supination weakness to a greater extent than proximal injury because the entire muscle complex is disrupted. Thus there is a greater functional deficit. However, there are other muscles that contribute to elbow flexion and supination so some function is maintained. In the event of a complete rupture, treatment can be either conservative – which will likely result in long term or chronic pain and weakness – or surgical.

It is also possible to have a partial rupture (Grade 2), after which the sufferer is predisposed to biceps tendinitis and compression of the median nerve.

Proximal biceps injury

Biceps tendonitis often occurs in the presence of rotator cuff inflammation and tears, and about half of all biceps ruptures occur in the long head, usually in the shoulder joint or in a groove (intertubercular groove) that houses the tendon in the front of the shoulder area. Since one of the bicep heads generally remains intact with this injury, function is only minimally impacted in the event of rupture, and treatment is most often non-surgical. When surgical intervention is indicated – largely due to pain – the tendon is either detached from the glenoid labrum in the shoulder joint and reattached elsewhere at the upper humerus (tenodesis) or the attachment to the humerus is simply severed (tenotomy).

Hoping for the best for Gary Sanchez – a very mild Grade 1 strain. In all likelihood though, ten days off will not be enough.

Your Body, Your Swing

 

For years golf professionals have been working with their clients on how to “fix” their swing.  In a recent post on www.GolfDigest.com, Jerry King discusses some great Tips & Tricks on how to avoid 4 common swing faults.  These tips and tricks can certainly be helpful, but in order to reduce the root cause of the swing faults, we must analyze our own bodies; there is more to the golf swing than just technique.  

Every golfer is unique and comes to the course with a different history.  Loss of mobility, strength and control has a large effect on the swing, and studies have shown that improving these factors through a structured exercise program can increase club and ball velocity and driving distance. 1  It is the accumulation of your entire physical history that is put to test when you step up and address each and every ball.  Avid golfers often spend years trying multiple techniques, clubs and products to get rid of their slice or improve their power, all the while never analyzing the most important equipment they own…themselves.  Many golfers know they should exercise, believing it will help their game, however they feel they need direction in order to know which exercises they will benefit from the most. Knowing this will prevent wasting time working on things that don’t need improvement.

We have spent years living in our bodies and watching them change as we age.  Why do we spend so much time and money on products, training videos and equipment and overlook the idea of improving ourselves? In a recent study, 36 male and female golfers were put through the Titleist Performance Institute Physical Screen with the goal of determining if there was a correlation between limitations found in their screen and some of the most common faults found in the golf swing.  At the conclusion of the study researchers found “when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on the left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit an early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing.”2

This is just one example of how poor mobility and control of our bodies can affect our golf swing.  The RPT golf improvement program, utilizing the TPI physical screen and swing analysis, was designed to address exactly this!  Our 6-week program achieves results! This program has helped many golfers obtain their goals, and in its 4th year running we are excited to offer it now in both our Upper West Side and Millburn locations!

References:

  1. Lephart, SM., Smoliga, JM., Myers, JB., Sell TC., Tsai, YS. “An eight-week golf-specific exercise program improves physical characteristics, swing mechanics, and golf performance in recreational golfers.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (2007): 860-9. Web.

 

  1. Gulgin, H., Schulte, B, Crawley, A. “Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Level 1 Movement Screens and Golf Swing Faults.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (2014): 534-39. Web.

Part Three: Fighting Inflammation With Nutrition – The Brain & Gut

Brain Foods: For General Health & Post Concussion Care

Following head injury, an anti-inflammatory diet (see Parts One & Two of this series) is recommended. Though drinking coffee has been shown to benefit brainpower and protect against dementia, in the immediate post-concussion period, caffeine should be avoided  However, in the event of post-concussion syndrome – when symptoms persist beyond the expected recovery time – the benefits of coffee may prove helpful in modulating symptoms such as headache and issues with alertness. There isn’t one magic answer here, but rather it might be advisable for the post-concussion sufferer to experiment and assess the outcome.Also related to headaches, checking Vitamin D levels in the blood can prove helpful in determining whether supplementation might prove beneficial (more on that below).

Nicotine is another substance contraindicated after concussion (not that it would be recommended at any other time). Likewise, avoiding alcohol is an important aspect of a brain healthy diet, particularly so in the event of head injury. Getting adequate sleep, adding exercise to one’s routine, as well as such things as mindfulness and meditation, also contributes to optimized brain function.

Some of the foods recommended for protecting cognitive function and memory include: avocados, beets, blueberries, bone broth, broccoli, celery, coconut oil, dark chocolate, egg yolks, green leafy veggies, rosemary, salmon, turmeric and walnutsSome of the best leafy greens are Swiss chard, kale, spinach, watercress and Romaine. Other fish besides salmon that are rich in good oils, like sardines, also make the cut.

Supplements for Cognitive and Neuroprotective Function

Fish oil supplements can provide another source of the omega-3 fatty acids our bodies need and which benefit brain function. It is recommended that consumers interested in these supplements buy only those from a quality source that controls for PCBs and oxidation. For more on the vital omega-3s EPA and DHA, which benefit us in myriad ways, here is a brief and wonderful synopsis of their neuroprotective properties.

Another supplement established in animal studies to have neuroprotective effects is Creatine. Nutrition conscious neurologists may recommend this agent for those who’ve suffered concussions and have persistent symptoms or are affected by neurodegenerative diseases. More studies are needed to verify the benefits of creatine for humans.

A third supplement often taken for its cognitive and neuroprotective benefits is MCT oil, which is a derivative of coconut oil, but it’s a little more complicated than that. Evidently not all MCT oils are created equal.

Bone Health Plus More

I always felt that with a proper diet, we get the necessary nutrients from food and so taking vitamins is not necessary. However, even I take a few vitamins these days. Vitamin D, important for bone health and likely a whole lot more, is found in very few foods. Though sun exposure helps in its natural production, conditions are not always optimal and sunscreen curtails this benefit. It is easy to become Vitamin D deficient, based on what has been established as the normative range. And since Vitamin D also aids in the absorption of calcium, it seems best to turn to a supplement when your levels are low. And that is the conclusion drawn from many studies on Vitamin D and Calcium for prevention of bone loss (osteopenia and osteoporosis) and fractures. However, the research is confusing. Some analyses do not support a benefit in increasing bone density in people over 50 or in preventing fracture in this population. It should be noted that many studies also point to an increased risk of kidney stones and a correlation with heart disease amongst those taking these supplements.

For a synopsis of outcomes from studies on Vitamin D and its impact on everything from colds to cancer, DocCheckNews most recent newsletter has a wonderful piece entitled Vitamin D-Religion: Amen. Some findings include:

  • Daily Vitamin D supplementation in those with low serum concentration resulted in a 12% decline in acute respiratory infections.  Universal supplementation was not recommended.
  • Men with low serum levels of Vitamin D suffered twice as often from chronic headaches. An ongoing Vitamin D study in Finland, with results due in 2018, is intended to answer remaining questions about the vitamin’s relationship with headache pain.
  • Though moderate supplemental doses are considered safe, in excess, Vitamin D may lead to increased falls and fracture in the elderly.
  • Vitamin D supplements taken during pregnancy may increase the risk of the child suffering food allergies later in life.

Foods that most of us associate with containing Vitamin D are: fatty fish, organ meats (uggh), eggs, and particularly dairy products. In addition to the dairy foods that many avoid these days, there are a variety of non-dairy foods that contain calcium. Again, it should be stressed that a healthy individual with normative levels, who eats a diet that supplies these nutrients, does not require supplements. And as noted, in larger doses they may prove harmful.

FODMAP

Those with gut issues such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) would do well to read up on this diet. The acronym stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols. These are short-chain carbohydrates that are incompletely absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and can be easily fermented by the bacteria in the gut.

Onions and garlic top the no-no list, but that list is a long one, highlighting foods that can trigger gastrointestinal symptoms. Experimenting to determine one’s particular sensitivities may be the way to go here as well.

Reflux Diet

Acid reflux, also known as GERD (GastroEsophogeal Reflux Disease) is a condition that involves exposure of the soft tissues of the esophagus to stomach acid. It can result in heartburn, but even in the absence of indigestion, it can result in such symptoms as a chronic dry cough, a sore throat, difficulty swallowing or bloating.

It is important to get an accurate diagnosis and crucial to follow a Reflux Diet that restricts acid intake. Foods to avoid include: tomatoes and tomato sauce, carbonated beverages, alcohol, caffeine, chocolate and citrus. Propping your upper torso and head up at night and not eating for three hours before bedtime are also recommended.

If you take medication to control reflux in order to eat as you please without consequence, that isn’t the way to go. Eating correctly and exercising regularly can make all the difference in avoiding the adverse effects of long-term use of medications that are meant for short term use only and are often over-prescribed.

Eye Health

Lutein is one of four carotenoids and is found in green leafy vegetables, red peppers, red spices like cayenne or paprika, and other colorful veggies like tomatoes. Carotenoids (the four are: alpha and beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene) are antioxidants (see Part One of this servies), and lutein has been found to have a preventive impact on macular degeneration and cataracts. A strong family history of macular degeneration, causing degrees of blindness with aging, and/or a diet lacking in an abundance of the foods mentioned above may be good reasons to consider a daily supplement high in lutein.

One additional note on tomatoes (which contain all four carotenoids), is that when they are eaten in combination with broccoli, there is found to be a relationship with prostate cancer prevention.

Exercise

Just as a diet rich in the right foods that also limits the evil ones (like sugar) provides protection from chronic illness, so does exercise. Weight training and weight-bearing exercise improves bone density, preventing fracture. It increases muscular strength, therefore improving function, balance, and reducing incidence of falls with aging. It is important for optimizing brain health and lessening incidence or severity of depression. Exercise also diminishes reflux. And, high intensity interval aerobic exercise slows the effect of aging; this benefit is likely related to the fact that exercise even helps to control inflammation, though knowing your limits and listening to your body is key

Part Two: Fighting Inflammation With Nutrition – What We Now Know About Eggs, Red Meat & More

Eggs – Good Bad or Indifferent?

The push to cut down on eggs, particularly yolks, has tapered, with eggs now shown not to have the impact on cholesterol as previously thought. Most of the cholesterol in our bodies is produced naturally and does not come from our food. Eggs (especially those that are pastured & local) are a great source of essential amino acids. These unique building blocks of proteins cannot be produced by the body and must come from food.

Two caveats on the benefits of eggs… Though some recommend yolks as part of a brain-healthy diet, when consumed more than moderately, eggs (particularly yolks) and poultry (with skin) have been shown to correlate with a higher incidence of prostate cancer recurrence or progression. Men, particularly those who fall in higher risk categories, beware.

In addition, some people have unknown food sensitivities. Sensitivity to eggs – which often exists below the pain threshold but can have adverse physiological and biological effects – is more common than many realize. Those with such a sensitivity who consume eggs (especially frequently or in greater volume) may see they adversely impact cognition, or exacerbate headaches, upset stomach, etc. If you notice persistent symptoms or those that fluctuate along with things you eat, it might be a good idea to be tested for food sensitivities.

Anti-inflammatory Diets

One of the more distinctive and restrictive anti-inflammatory diets is The Bulletproof Diet. It replaces sugars with healthy fats, incorporates a focus on organic food, is gluten free and does not allow beans. Eliminating all processed foods and grains limits sugars dramatically, as does moderating natural sugars by limiting fruit intakeGhee (pictured above), which is butter minus the milk solids and water, leaving only butterfat, is another healthy fat that is a staple of this program. Bulletproof Coffee, can keep you feeling full and focused. I’ve gotten first hand reports!

There is much advice out there regarding diet, some of it conflicting. However, there are some commonalities.

Getting the most attention for what are often termed heart healthy diets are the Mediterranean and DASH diets. Each has been shown to be effective and personal preference may play a role in which to choose if you if you want a specific food program. A Mediterranean Diet is rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, olive oil, beans, legumes and herbs and leans more toward fish for protein. In this diet, dairy, poultry and then lean meat are at the top of the food pyramid, to be eaten in measured amounts. It is a plan that has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

The DASH diet (DASH stands for Dietary Approaches To Stop Hypertension) has some similarities but is less restrictive of low fat dairy. Here is a comparison between the two.


Salt

Both diet plans, like the generic anti-inflammatory and brain-healthy recommendations, include a lot of fiber from vegetables and fruits. All heart healthy food plans limit sugar and salt. Sodium, which can cause water retention, may result in an increase in blood pressure, placing greater strain on the heart and blood vessels. High blood pressure is one of the common cardiac risk factors.

Red Meat

Many of these diets limit intake of red meat, though pastured grass-fed meats are recommended as a staple of the Bulletproof Diet. Red meats (particularly processed meats) are often restricted in other diets because some research has tied larger consumption of it to increased risk for colon cancer. However, it has been shown that these studies were unable to control for other poor dietary or health habits that were confounding factors influencing outcomes.

One high fat, low carb diet is that recommended by Gary Taubes, who wrote The Case Against Sugar, Why We Get Fat. He and Fred Pescatore, MD, creator of The Hampton Diet, advocate low carb, higher fat eating plans that do not place as much restriction on red meat. I’m a fan of Dr. Mark Hyman, who wrote Eat Fat Get Thin (amongst other books) and whose recommendations make a lot of sense. Like all the authors mentioned here, he explains why prior studies led to inaccurate conclusions and points to newer research supporting the fact that a heart healthy diet can include grass fed beef without adverse consequence.

What They Said About Vegetable Oils (Like Canola)? Never Mind. All Oils Are Not Created Equal

Stick to extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil. Especially when cooking. Heating vegetable oils alters their structure causing oxidation and the formation of aldehydes. Oxidation results in free radicals (which were addressed in Part One), which then result in cell damage that causes a host of adverse effects on the body. High levels of aldehydes have been shown to correlate with an increased risk of heart disease and cancer.

Olive oil has the lowest oxidation rate of the cooking oils and has also been shown to raise HDL and lower LDL cholesterol, changes that are good for heart disease prevention.

Another healthy cooking note is to avoid charring foods (particularly meats/fleshy foods) because that too can have a carcinogenic effect.

Part Three, the final blog of this nutrition series, covers specific food recommendations and nutritional issues related to brain health and post concussion care, for those with gastric issues (Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Gastric Reflux), as well as nutritional guidance for eye health.

Fighting Inflammation With Nutrition

Whether dealing with the aftermath of an injury or simply seeking to optimize one’s health and wellness, there is wisdom in following a diet rich in foods considered to have anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a major contributor to a number of illnesses, including diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and atherosclerosis, which predispose to cardiovascular events. Also Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, and autoimmune disorders, such as Lupus and Multiple Sclerosis. Conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system (such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis) also play into this dynamic. Even depression and cancer correlate strongly with levels of inflammation.

How we eat can play a role in protecting us from illness by minimizing chronic inflammation and boosting brain and heart health. Weight control is a secondary, but welcome, byproduct of this thoughtful way of eating. Armed with the knowledge we now have, nutritional guidance should be a part of care delivery in every medical discipline, including physical therapy and orthopedics.

The world of nutrition and health has been turned upside down in recent years.


The Skinny On Fats

The old school emphasis on reducing all fat intake – but especially saturated and trans fats – has been replaced with an emphasis on eating healthy fats (including some saturated fats, like that in coconut oil). Other healthy fats include those in olive oil, avocados and nuts. In fact, your body needs these fats to function optimally, fight inflammation, and even to lose excess pounds.

Several articles I’d recommend on the subject include this one on why we need fat in our diets, this one on Facts About Fats, and this one on why carbs and not fats cause fatty liver disease.


Sugar Is The Enemy

Sugar is now thought to be the evil ingredient and the most significant dietary contributor to inflammation. It seems that this line of thinking, supported by a great deal of research, is going to prevail for the long haul.

Sugar comes in many forms, whether from refined carbohydrates, or that added to beverages, or even the natural sugars in fruits or dairy. They might be listed on an ingredients label as sucrose, corn syrup, glucose, fructose and galactose, lactose or maltose. Once ingested, these other sugars become glucose. Though both are processed by the body into sugars, refined carbohydrates are more of an issue than whole grains in our diet because much of the fiber, nutrients and essential fatty acids are eliminated in the refining process.

A rise in blood glucose triggers a release of insulin and other substances that create an environment conducive to inflammation. More on this can be found here.

Carbs also produce more belly and liver fat than dietary fat itself. In addition, excess sugars contribute to cholesterol imbalances – elevated LDLs and lowered HDLs, contributing to heart attack risk.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Rule

Found in fish (salmon is king – pun intended), nuts (particularly walnuts), certain oils, leafy greens and flax seeds, Omega-3s are an essential part of our diet. They serve a multitude of purposes and our bodies don’t produce them. They are in the cell membranes of all our cells and are integral to the production of certain hormones that do everything from assisting with regulation of blood clotting, blood vessel function and control of inflammation to impacting genetic function. Also integral to the findings is that Omega-3 Fatty Acids are an important nutrient for optimal brain health.

Here is one piece on Omega-3s. Here is another that describes their impact on many disease processes. Their antioxidant properties and the impact they have on inflammation have been explored in a significant amount of research, some of which is discussed here.

Antioxidants

Chemicals in our bodies called free radicals can wreck havoc by damaging our cells, thus altering their structure and function. Antioxidants, extracted from foods that we eat, combat free radicals to limit that damage which, left unchecked, contributes to a host of chronic conditions. Other than for prevention of age-related macular degeneration, studies involving antioxidant supplements did not show them to be beneficial. However, evidence has shown that a diet rich in the naturally occurring antioxidants found in vegetables, fruits and whole grains does offer protection against cognitive decline and the diseases associated with aging.

More on specific foods (like eggs, red meat and oils), in Part Two of this series. Part three focuses on nutritional recommendations for brain health and post concussion, for those suffering from gastric issues (like IBS and reflux) and on foods for Eye Health.